How long does it take to repair damaged hair?

Follicles feeling a bit fried? There are ways to restore it to its former glory. If your hair has been damaged – either by heat, bleach or general wear and tear – it can lose its natural elasticity and moisture. The time it will take to repair is entirely relative to the extent of the damage. If it’s seriously frazzled, then you might have to just wait for it to grow out, so this will depend on how quickly your hair grows. Using products that are designed to nourish the scalp and hair can definitely speed up this process, but on average you’d be looking at six months to a year to fully see a difference in your hair’s condition. Read on to find out how to get it back to looking its best. 1. Cut your losses  While you can try and replenish it with conditioners and oils, split ends are a lost cause. (Despite what some claim, split ends can’t ‘seal’ back together.) Unless you trim the ends of hair which are split and broken, the damage can travel further up the hair shaft so it’s best to get them cut and focus on nourishing the roots and mid-lengths of the hair. 2. Use gentle, non-drying products If you have damaged hair, start by cutting out harsh, drying ingredients from your hair care regime, which includes silicones, sulphates and ‘bad’ alcohols – often found in shampoo. And you’re in luck, because MONPURE products– like our Strengthening Silk Protein Shampoo and Strengthening Essence Conditioner – contain none of the above, and also star vegan silk peptides to boost the condition and strength of hair, making it less vulnerable to heat damage by providing a ‘second-skin’ effect to the scalp and hair follicles. Hydrating ingredients such as glycerin and aloe vera can also revive dry, damaged hair (found in both of the above products, together with our Clarifying Scalp Scrub). 3. Invest in a good conditioner While alcohol in haircare is seen as detrimental to its condition, our Strengthening Essence Conditioner does contain two alcohols: cetyl alcohol and cetearyl alcohol – however, these are ‘good’ alcohols for your hair. Because instead of making hair dry and brittle by dissolving its natural oils, they work as humectants, which draw moisture into the hair like a sponge, helping it to become smooth and preventing knots and tangles. As well as vegan silk peptides (see above) our conditioner also contains panthenol, another hydrating ingredient, to leave hair shiny and strong. 4. Be gentle when brushing and styling Hair strands are extremely fragile, so it’s important to treat them with care – especially when wet. Rough drying with a towel and brushing too vigorously can further the damage. Swap your cotton towel for a less abrasive microfibre version and pat your hair dry gently. Once fully dry, brush from the ends of the hair upwards to loosen tangles. According to our resident dermatologist Dr Sue Ann Chan: “When it comes to boosting hair growth, I would advise to avoid common causes of hair ‘wear and tear’. For example, limit use of ceramic straighteners or hairdryers on a high setting. It’s also best to avoid pulling your hair back in tight braids or ponytails.” If your hair is naturally wavy or curly, try working with your natural texture rather than spending hours trying to get it poker straight. If you have to use heated styling tools, try using a lower heat setting and always prep hair beforehand with a heat protector spray.  5. Feed your follicles to speed up healthy hair growth While you might not be able to rewind the clock on hair that’s dry and broken, you can give new hair growth the best possible chance with our Follicle Boost Hair Density Serum and Nourish and Stimulate Scalp Mask. This formidable duo work to stimulate the scalp, improve cell turnover and help prevent hair loss and thinning with the help of vitamin-rich castor oil, collagen boosting retinol and pumpkin seed extract (the latter scientifically proven to block an enzyme linked to hair loss) – while actively promoting thicker, fuller hair growth.  Any questions for the team? Feel free to email us at experts@monpure.com.  

Learn more

Understanding Menopausal Hair Loss

  Many women experience hair loss as they go through the menopause. We spoke to MONPURE Resident GP, Dr Simmy Kaur to understand more about this condition and the options that are available. How does going through the menopause contribute to hair loss, thinning and dullness? As the body goes through the menopause, various hormonal changes occur to include the reduction in the production of oestrogen. Hairs on our scalp usually grow in ‘tufts’ of 3 to 4, but menopause can cause these tufts to slowly lose hairs. This process, known as hair miniaturisation, can result in finer, shorter hair and ultimately hair loss. Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is considered to be the equivalent of male pattern baldness. FPHL usually peaks during the reproductive years and after the menopause which suggests a strong hormonal link. Women with FPHL usually notice a very gradual thinning of the hair, mostly at the top of the head but also at the sides. Some women may notice thinning of the ponytail or a change in the texture and length of the hair. Interestingly, about 50% of women with FPHL have a family history of female hair loss, which suggests that there is also a genetic component. What can we do to mitigate the effects of menopause on hair loss? Looking after the hair follicle and shaft from day one is the key to ensuring that we give our hair the best environment to grow and flourish! Hair care practices such as colouring, perming or relaxing and the use of heat can cause damage - this alongside going through the menopause can have significant effects on hair quality. Therefore, avoid chemical treatments wherever possible and keep the use of heat to a minimum!Use a good quality shampoo and conditioner to keep the hair shaft looking healthy. In addition to this, using a treatment such as MONPURE's Nourish and Stimulate Scalp Mask can help to improve the health of the scalp by 'feeding' the hair follicles with essential vitamins and nutrients. The Follicle Boost Hair Density Serum can also work wonders to help to optimise the environment of the scalp to allow the hair to grow to its optimum, exactly what the scalp-skin and hair needs at this time. MONPURE's Follicle Boost Hair Density Serum also contains pumpkin seed extract. Why is pumpkin seed extract good for menopausal hair loss? In FPHL there is an increase in the transformation of the hormone testosterone to a chemical called DHT. DHT has been shown to contribute to hair loss. This process is helped along by an enzyme called 5-alpha reductase.Pumpkin seed extract has been scientifically proven to block the action of 5-alpha reductase, therefore helping to prevent hair loss. In addition to this, it contains fatty acids, antioxidants and has anti-inflammatory properties that are essential for good hair growth. Does HRT work for hair loss? Many women ask me if the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is beneficial in reducing hair loss after menopause. Unfortunately HRT has not been adequately studied or licensed for the treatment of FPHL in post-menopausal women; therefore it should only be considered if it's indicated for other reasons. What kinds of medication can GPs prescribe for hair loss in older women? Are there any risks/side-effects? FPHL tends to be very gradual and follows a very particular pattern, therefore if hair loss is sudden or if the features of hair loss are unusual - other causes should be considered. Thyroid problems, low iron and low vitamin D can contribute to FPHL. All of which are easily treatable by your GP. In some cases, topical treatments like minoxidil can be considered to see if they help, however they can sometimes cause scalp irritation and increased hair growth in unwanted areas. Some women find that hair accessories and camouflage products can be really beneficial in helping boost confidence. You may have heard about the use of 'blood pressure tablets' (spironolactone) and tablets traditionally used to treat large prostates in men (finasteride) for hair loss - these are usually started after specialist referral to a dermatologist as they too can have some unwanted side effects. In recent years there has been lots of interest in newer, more innovative treatments for hair loss such as laser, micro-needling, hair transplantation and fat transfer - the results of which are very promising. Your GP can also talk to you about getting psychological support for the emotional effects of hair loss, which can sometimes be just as hard to manage as the hair loss itself - don't suffer in silence.Have a question for our team of experts? Email us at experts@monpure.com  

Learn more

What causes female hair loss?

It's normal to lose some hair. We can lose between 50 and 100 hairs a day, often without noticing. Hair loss is not usually anything to be worried about, but occasionally it can be a sign of a medical condition. It’s important to emphasise that hair loss in women is very common, more common than most people realise.  “Hair loss can vary tremendously from person to person,” notes MONPURE’s Resident General Practitioner Dr Simmy Kaur. “As a general rule of thumb - if you notice thin or bald patches, a visible scalp, a sudden increase in hair fall, or a gradual decline in the thickness of the hair, seek help from your doctor.” So what tends to cause it? Below are some of the main contributors to female hair loss. Stress “The stress hormone called cortisol regulates the normal functioning of our hair follicles,” explains MONPURE resident dermatologist Dr Sue Ann Chan. “When cortisol is present at high concentrations, it causes cells in the hair follicles to undergo apoptosis (i.e. die) prematurely by up to 40%, resulting in hair loss.” Stress and anxiety can also manifest itself as trichotillomania, characterised by an uncontrollable urge to pull out one’s hair. (See: 2 What are the different types of female hair loss?) Poor Scalp Health A healthy, calm and hydrated scalp is also a key factor in how long hair stays in its ‘anagen phase’ (growth phase) and how quickly it enters the ‘telogen phase’ (shedding phase).  “I advise my patients to care for their scalp in the same way as they care for the skin on their face,” notes Dr Chan. “Too often the scalp gets neglected which can lead to hair loss and also a dull appearance in the hair in general.”    Hormones A hormonal imbalance can lead to a number of repercussions, such as acne, weight gain – and hair loss. While oestrogens (female hormones) work to keep hairs in their anagen (growth) phase for the maximum length of time, androgens (male hormones) do the opposite, shortening the growth cycle and moving the hair prematurely into the shedding phase. This includes: Menopause “As the body goes through the menopause, various hormonal changes occur to include the reduction in the production of oestrogen,” Dr Kaur explains. “These hormonal changes can alter the natural growth cycle of the hair follicle, which can result in finer, shorter hair and ultimately hair loss.”Pregnancy (Post-Partum) While pregnancy can actually make a lot of women’s hair grow through fuller, many notice an increase in shedding once they’ve given birth. As women’s oestrogen levels return to normal after giving birth, the hair loss is just backdated shedding of hair that would have normally fallen out earlier. This should return to normal after three to six months, but the stress of pregnancy or a new baby sometimes can prolong or worsen hair loss. Hormonal Contraception “If you have hair that is particularly sensitive to androgens (male hormones), some pills may cause increased hair shedding because they have a ‘higher androgenic activity.’ These can cause hairs to stay in the resting ‘telogen’ phase for longer,” says Dr Kaur. “Stopping the pill can sometimes cause the hair to enter the shedding phase too quickly because of the sudden drop in oestrogen - causing a common, temporary type of hair loss called ‘telogen effluvium (TE).’ (The hair does grow back though, usually after about six months.)” Overactive / underactive thyroid Our metabolism is regulated by the thyroid, which controls the production of proteins and tissue use of oxygen. So if the thyroid becomes overactive (hyperthyroidism) or underactive (hypothyroidism), the hair follicles can be affected leading to hair loss, which normally manifests evenly over the scalp, as opposed to being concentrated in one specific area. Iron deficiency/anaemia Iron is probably the most important nutrient for hair growth, as without it, the body can’t produce haemoglobin – which carries oxygen via the blood to repair and maintain the cells in your body, including those that produce the protein responsible for hair growth. Crash dieting Although there’s a current craze for fasting and extreme detoxing, this can have disastrous consequences when not carried out under strict medical supervision. Reduced food intake results in a lack of nutrients needed to sustain the hair follicle (such as iron – see above) so it can function properly. The natural life cycle of hair is that it grows and then falls out, during which time there is a resting ‘telogen’ period. If the body doesn’t get these vital nutrients during this period, it can actually stop new hairs from forming – resulting in hair loss and bald patches. Illness One of the commonest causes of hair loss is called "telogen effluvium". This can be triggered by any severe illness, for instance pneumonia or a major operation. The stress of the illness causes all hair follicles to go into their resting phase and hair growth temporarily ceases. COVID-19 Many scientists are considering hair loss to be a COVID symptom. Last August, Dr Natalie Lambert from Indiana University School of Medicine and Survivor Corps published a report which stated that 65.7% of 1,700 respondents were experiencing hair loss.  Another cohort study of patients has now found that one in five people hospitalised with Covid-19 experienced hair loss within six months of first being infected with the virus. Of the 1,655 people who took part in the study out of Jin Yin-tan Hospital in Wuhan last year that has been published in The Lancet Journal, 359 - or 22 per cent - reported losing hair. Discover more and watch our film #ItsNotJustHair at monpure.com/itsnotjusthair  

Learn more

What Not To Say To Someone With Hair Loss

  While female hair loss is a topic that rarely gets talked about, the lack of understanding can lead to some awkward and potentially insensitive conversations for those going through it. But there are ways to broach the topic without causing offence. One of our campaign stars Beth Finlay tells us more ... Women’s hair loss is not exactly an easy subject to talk about and as someone who’s suffered from Alopecia Areata for 10 years, I know this all too well. Whether you know someone going through it or you’ve experienced it yourself, expressing it to people can be difficult. When my hair started falling out at the age of 17, I was unbelievably embarrassed about it. I thought people would make fun of me, think I was weird and I also thought they would be disgusted by the fact some of my hair had fallen out. I spent years worrying if someone could see my bald patches or if they knew I was wearing a wig. Losing your hair as a woman can be soul destroying and it took me years to accept myself without hair because, let’s be honest, it just isn’t normalised in society. It’s a topic that isn’t talked about enough to enable women going through it to feel comfortable in their own skin. The thing is, studies show that fewer than 45% of women go through life with a full head of hair, so if it’s so common, why is it such a taboo subject?  We’re programmed to certain beauty standards and for women this often means having perfectly unattainable hair. From our Instagram feeds to movies and TV shows we’re constantly faced with the pressure to look a certain way. So when you lose your hair and you no longer represent what’s “feminine”, it can be hard to feel comfortable in your own skin. This can make many women (including myself) feel unattractive and unworthy. Where it’s normal and accepted for a man to have a shaved head, women with no hair are often mistaken for having a terminal illness or going through a nervous breakdown.  This social stigma surrounding women’s hair loss is part of the problem. I’ve been met with many comments about my hair (or lack of it) and often they come across as rude or uneducated on the topic. I’ve developed a thicker skin but it doesn’t mean the comments don’t hurt or upset me. Society as a whole has a lack of understanding on the topic because it’s rarely talked about, so in order to teach people about it we must open the conversation.  If you’re unsure how to talk to someone about their hair loss, I’ve outlined some ways of asking or discussing it without causing offence. Be empathetic and understanding but rather than offering up advice, take an opportunity to get educated. Ways to ask women about their hair loss: I love your shaved head! What made you decide to do it? You really suit a shaved head, do you mind if I ask you about why you chose to do it? I know someone who has experienced hair loss and I just want to say you’re amazing Do you mind if I ask about your hair loss and how it happened? Could you tell me about your hair loss? What NOT to say: Do you have cancer? Are you suffering from a terminal illness? What’s wrong with you? Are you having some sort of breakdown? Maybe you should try not to get so stressed? Are you wearing a wig…? I can’t think of anything worse than losing my hair Maybe it’s your diet... Click here to learn more about our campaign and watch our groundbreaking film It’s Not Just Hair.  

What Is Trichotillomania?

Pronounced: trik-oh-till-oh-MAY-nee- uh or often shortened to TTM or ‘trich’, trichotillomania is a type of hair loss which is an anxiety condition. Watch Hattie’s story:  View this post on Instagram A post shared by MONPURE London (@monpurelondon)   What Is Trichotillomania? Trichotillomania occurs when patients have a strong urge to persistently rub or pull out their hair. It can be accompanied by other disorders, including depression, anxiety or obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). As with other types of hair loss, such as alopecia areata, periods of intense stress may trigger it.  Unfortunately, it remains one of the least researched and most misunderstood disorders, and many people feel like they’re the only ones going through it. Hair loss advocate Hattie Gilford explains: “A lot of people don't even know what trichotillomania is, even though one in 50 people have the condition. I think this is largely because people often feel too ashamed to talk about it. I really hope people watch this campaign and realise that they're not alone.”     She continues, “People often say 'just stop pulling your hair out" which is absolutely impossible – it's far from that simple. I battled trichotillomania for 18 years and it's the hardest journey I've ever been on. I felt like I was the only person in the world with trichotillomania, because it's not often spoken about.” Some people may pull their hair for sensory stimulation often focusing on the most coarse hairs on their head – as writer Ava Welsing-Kitcher wrote about for a piece in Stylist, explaining how it started:  “When I felt anxious or even just bored while watching TV, I’d absent-mindedly find my hand reaching towards my crown. The tension would build as I rifled through hairs to find the perfect one to pluck; once I had done so, the anxiety dissolved, only to be replaced with shame and frustration… but that wouldn’t stop me from repeating it. And so went the vicious cycle.” She describes how this became a regular occurrence. “As a teenager, I saw my hair pulling as a freakish bad habit … I’d catch my mother staring at my sparse crown area with such intense worry that it hurt me more than anything. ‘By getting rid of the coarse hairs, you’re denying your African heritage,’ she’d caution me, but it was never about race for me. The selected hairs just stood out, in the same way a lone grey might.” Trichotillomania is something our Head of Content Viola Levy also suffered with as a teenager. “I have naturally wavy hair and I tend to pull out any strands that are particularly coarse. I’m doing this with grey hairs too as I get older and more of them crop up. I also have a tendency to try and find brittle hair strands and snap them in half when I’m stressed,” she explains. “I did this a lot as a teenager – I remember taking a GCSE exam and the white question paper being covered in bits of my black hair by the end of the two hours. I used to pull at the nape of my neck where it was less visible (I still have tufts where it hasn’t grown back properly). When my hairdresser lifted up the back of my head, he asked why the hair was patchy and broken.” Constant hair pulling from the scalp can result in patches of hair loss, as well as scarring and infected hair follicles. It can also lead to scarring alopecia, where the pulled-out hair doesn’t always grow back. Hair pulling and subsequent hair loss can be very distressing for the person suffering it, and can interfere with their day to day lives and self-esteem. Some people with trichotillomania wear wigs or wig toppers, or style their hair in ways to disguise the areas where the hair has been pulled out. Trichotillomania also disproportionately affects women (possibly due to the fact that many of us have long hair which is easier to pull out). A staggering 70-93% of preadolescents and young adults with trichotillomania are female,* while according to the American Journal of psychiatry, adult female sufferers tend to outnumber males by three to one. In the 2010 documentary on trichotillomania Girls On The Pull, hair extensions specialist and salon owner Lucinda Ellery called it, “the worst form of hair loss that I have ever witnessed.” On her clients with the disorder, she used an intra-lace system designed to cover the area with mesh, extensions and hair, which acts as a barrier, preventing pulling and giving the hair a chance to re-grow. “The intra-lace is not a cure-all,” she noted. “Covering it up might make you feel better, but you have to learn to deal with the impulses.” Types of treatment for trichotillomania include hypnotherapy and cognitive behavioural therapy which aim to ascertain and dismantle the behavioural patterns and common triggers that contribute to the hair pulling. Talking therapies, relaxation and deep breathing techniques to deal with any underlying anxiety conditions are also used.  If you find yourself pulling your hair out, remember that you’re not alone and – most importantly – that it’s not your fault. It’s important to speak to your GP at the earliest opportunity, who can recommend the appropriate course of treatment and therapies to deal with any accompanying mental health issues.      You can also join our new community support page @It’sNotJustHair_ is a place where women with hair loss can share their stories, understand more about the condition and connect with others going through a similar experience. Hattie features in our new campaign film It’s Not Just Hair and has dealt with trichotillomania for 18 years. Click here to read more about her story. If you would like to share your own hair loss story, upload a video or selfie and don’t forget to tag @monpurelondon #itsnotjusthair . Let’s break the silence surrounding female hair loss. Have a question for our team of experts? Email us at experts@monpure.com *Mayo Clinic  

MONPURE in Vogue

MONPURE have been making waves recently, both at home and across the pond. It’s not every day you get on the radar of US Vogue, but we recently caught the attention of writer Chloe Malle, who had this to say about our range: “The London-based brand focuses on the scalp as the key to healthy hair with a variety of hair stimulating options.”     Our awareness-raising campaign It’s Not Just Hair has also been gaining traction in the media. We were delighted when legendary British supermodel Jade Parfitt lent her support to the campaign, appearing in The Sunday Telegraph’s Stella Magazine where she spoke about her own experience with postpartum hair loss.  Speaking to beauty editor Sonia Haria, she commented: “You realise how your hair health is tied to your mental health, how you feel about yourself and how you present yourself to the world.” You can watch Jade Parfitt’s recent Insta Live chat with one of our campaign stars Beth Finlay here. Two more stars of our campaign Christala Fletcher and Rima Theisen were recently profiled in The Metro, speaking about their experiences with hair loss. ‘It’s incredibly sad that female hair loss is not deemed acceptable in comparison to male hair loss,’ says Christala. ‘Women are often judged and ridiculed for not having long flowing locks and that for some reason through negative images in the media “bald” equals “ugly” or not feminine when in actual fact it takes a beautiful strong woman to be able to rock a bald head. ‘I find it brings out each woman’s unique beauty when you remove the hair.’ And if that wasn’t enough, our Hydrate and Soothe Scalp Serum is a firm favourite with the editors at The New York Times T Magazine who included it in a recent roundup. “For those whose scalps are itchy, irritated or sunburned, there’s MONPURE’s Hydrate and Soothe Scalp Serum.” Discover more about MONPURE’s pioneering new campaign here.  

How long does it take to repair damaged hair?

Follicles feeling a bit fried? There are ways to restore it to its former glory. If your hair has been damaged – either by heat, bleach or general wear and tear – it can lose its natural elasticity and moisture. The time it will take to repair is entirely relative to the extent of the damage. If it’s seriously frazzled, then you might have to just wait for it to grow out, so this will depend on how quickly your hair grows. Using products that are designed to nourish the scalp and hair can definitely speed up this process, but on average you’d be looking at six months to a year to fully see a difference in your hair’s condition. Read on to find out how to get it back to looking its best. 1. Cut your losses  While you can try and replenish it with conditioners and oils, split ends are a lost cause. (Despite what some claim, split ends can’t ‘seal’ back together.) Unless you trim the ends of hair which are split and broken, the damage can travel further up the hair shaft so it’s best to get them cut and focus on nourishing the roots and mid-lengths of the hair. 2. Use gentle, non-drying products If you have damaged hair, start by cutting out harsh, drying ingredients from your hair care regime, which includes silicones, sulphates and ‘bad’ alcohols – often found in shampoo. And you’re in luck, because MONPURE products– like our Strengthening Silk Protein Shampoo and Strengthening Essence Conditioner – contain none of the above, and also star vegan silk peptides to boost the condition and strength of hair, making it less vulnerable to heat damage by providing a ‘second-skin’ effect to the scalp and hair follicles. Hydrating ingredients such as glycerin and aloe vera can also revive dry, damaged hair (found in both of the above products, together with our Clarifying Scalp Scrub). 3. Invest in a good conditioner While alcohol in haircare is seen as detrimental to its condition, our Strengthening Essence Conditioner does contain two alcohols: cetyl alcohol and cetearyl alcohol – however, these are ‘good’ alcohols for your hair. Because instead of making hair dry and brittle by dissolving its natural oils, they work as humectants, which draw moisture into the hair like a sponge, helping it to become smooth and preventing knots and tangles. As well as vegan silk peptides (see above) our conditioner also contains panthenol, another hydrating ingredient, to leave hair shiny and strong. 4. Be gentle when brushing and styling Hair strands are extremely fragile, so it’s important to treat them with care – especially when wet. Rough drying with a towel and brushing too vigorously can further the damage. Swap your cotton towel for a less abrasive microfibre version and pat your hair dry gently. Once fully dry, brush from the ends of the hair upwards to loosen tangles. According to our resident dermatologist Dr Sue Ann Chan: “When it comes to boosting hair growth, I would advise to avoid common causes of hair ‘wear and tear’. For example, limit use of ceramic straighteners or hairdryers on a high setting. It’s also best to avoid pulling your hair back in tight braids or ponytails.” If your hair is naturally wavy or curly, try working with your natural texture rather than spending hours trying to get it poker straight. If you have to use heated styling tools, try using a lower heat setting and always prep hair beforehand with a heat protector spray.  5. Feed your follicles to speed up healthy hair growth While you might not be able to rewind the clock on hair that’s dry and broken, you can give new hair growth the best possible chance with our Follicle Boost Hair Density Serum and Nourish and Stimulate Scalp Mask. This formidable duo work to stimulate the scalp, improve cell turnover and help prevent hair loss and thinning with the help of vitamin-rich castor oil, collagen boosting retinol and pumpkin seed extract (the latter scientifically proven to block an enzyme linked to hair loss) – while actively promoting thicker, fuller hair growth.  Any questions for the team? Feel free to email us at experts@monpure.com.  

Learn more

Understanding Menopausal Hair Loss

  Many women experience hair loss as they go through the menopause. We spoke to MONPURE Resident GP, Dr Simmy Kaur to understand more about this condition and the options that are available. How does going through the menopause contribute to hair loss, thinning and dullness? As the body goes through the menopause, various hormonal changes occur to include the reduction in the production of oestrogen. Hairs on our scalp usually grow in ‘tufts’ of 3 to 4, but menopause can cause these tufts to slowly lose hairs. This process, known as hair miniaturisation, can result in finer, shorter hair and ultimately hair loss. Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is considered to be the equivalent of male pattern baldness. FPHL usually peaks during the reproductive years and after the menopause which suggests a strong hormonal link. Women with FPHL usually notice a very gradual thinning of the hair, mostly at the top of the head but also at the sides. Some women may notice thinning of the ponytail or a change in the texture and length of the hair. Interestingly, about 50% of women with FPHL have a family history of female hair loss, which suggests that there is also a genetic component. What can we do to mitigate the effects of menopause on hair loss? Looking after the hair follicle and shaft from day one is the key to ensuring that we give our hair the best environment to grow and flourish! Hair care practices such as colouring, perming or relaxing and the use of heat can cause damage - this alongside going through the menopause can have significant effects on hair quality. Therefore, avoid chemical treatments wherever possible and keep the use of heat to a minimum!Use a good quality shampoo and conditioner to keep the hair shaft looking healthy. In addition to this, using a treatment such as MONPURE's Nourish and Stimulate Scalp Mask can help to improve the health of the scalp by 'feeding' the hair follicles with essential vitamins and nutrients. The Follicle Boost Hair Density Serum can also work wonders to help to optimise the environment of the scalp to allow the hair to grow to its optimum, exactly what the scalp-skin and hair needs at this time. MONPURE's Follicle Boost Hair Density Serum also contains pumpkin seed extract. Why is pumpkin seed extract good for menopausal hair loss? In FPHL there is an increase in the transformation of the hormone testosterone to a chemical called DHT. DHT has been shown to contribute to hair loss. This process is helped along by an enzyme called 5-alpha reductase.Pumpkin seed extract has been scientifically proven to block the action of 5-alpha reductase, therefore helping to prevent hair loss. In addition to this, it contains fatty acids, antioxidants and has anti-inflammatory properties that are essential for good hair growth. Does HRT work for hair loss? Many women ask me if the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is beneficial in reducing hair loss after menopause. Unfortunately HRT has not been adequately studied or licensed for the treatment of FPHL in post-menopausal women; therefore it should only be considered if it's indicated for other reasons. What kinds of medication can GPs prescribe for hair loss in older women? Are there any risks/side-effects? FPHL tends to be very gradual and follows a very particular pattern, therefore if hair loss is sudden or if the features of hair loss are unusual - other causes should be considered. Thyroid problems, low iron and low vitamin D can contribute to FPHL. All of which are easily treatable by your GP. In some cases, topical treatments like minoxidil can be considered to see if they help, however they can sometimes cause scalp irritation and increased hair growth in unwanted areas. Some women find that hair accessories and camouflage products can be really beneficial in helping boost confidence. You may have heard about the use of 'blood pressure tablets' (spironolactone) and tablets traditionally used to treat large prostates in men (finasteride) for hair loss - these are usually started after specialist referral to a dermatologist as they too can have some unwanted side effects. In recent years there has been lots of interest in newer, more innovative treatments for hair loss such as laser, micro-needling, hair transplantation and fat transfer - the results of which are very promising. Your GP can also talk to you about getting psychological support for the emotional effects of hair loss, which can sometimes be just as hard to manage as the hair loss itself - don't suffer in silence.Have a question for our team of experts? Email us at experts@monpure.com  

Learn more

What causes female hair loss?

It's normal to lose some hair. We can lose between 50 and 100 hairs a day, often without noticing. Hair loss is not usually anything to be worried about, but occasionally it can be a sign of a medical condition. It’s important to emphasise that hair loss in women is very common, more common than most people realise.  “Hair loss can vary tremendously from person to person,” notes MONPURE’s Resident General Practitioner Dr Simmy Kaur. “As a general rule of thumb - if you notice thin or bald patches, a visible scalp, a sudden increase in hair fall, or a gradual decline in the thickness of the hair, seek help from your doctor.” So what tends to cause it? Below are some of the main contributors to female hair loss. Stress “The stress hormone called cortisol regulates the normal functioning of our hair follicles,” explains MONPURE resident dermatologist Dr Sue Ann Chan. “When cortisol is present at high concentrations, it causes cells in the hair follicles to undergo apoptosis (i.e. die) prematurely by up to 40%, resulting in hair loss.” Stress and anxiety can also manifest itself as trichotillomania, characterised by an uncontrollable urge to pull out one’s hair. (See: 2 What are the different types of female hair loss?) Poor Scalp Health A healthy, calm and hydrated scalp is also a key factor in how long hair stays in its ‘anagen phase’ (growth phase) and how quickly it enters the ‘telogen phase’ (shedding phase).  “I advise my patients to care for their scalp in the same way as they care for the skin on their face,” notes Dr Chan. “Too often the scalp gets neglected which can lead to hair loss and also a dull appearance in the hair in general.”    Hormones A hormonal imbalance can lead to a number of repercussions, such as acne, weight gain – and hair loss. While oestrogens (female hormones) work to keep hairs in their anagen (growth) phase for the maximum length of time, androgens (male hormones) do the opposite, shortening the growth cycle and moving the hair prematurely into the shedding phase. This includes: Menopause “As the body goes through the menopause, various hormonal changes occur to include the reduction in the production of oestrogen,” Dr Kaur explains. “These hormonal changes can alter the natural growth cycle of the hair follicle, which can result in finer, shorter hair and ultimately hair loss.”Pregnancy (Post-Partum) While pregnancy can actually make a lot of women’s hair grow through fuller, many notice an increase in shedding once they’ve given birth. As women’s oestrogen levels return to normal after giving birth, the hair loss is just backdated shedding of hair that would have normally fallen out earlier. This should return to normal after three to six months, but the stress of pregnancy or a new baby sometimes can prolong or worsen hair loss. Hormonal Contraception “If you have hair that is particularly sensitive to androgens (male hormones), some pills may cause increased hair shedding because they have a ‘higher androgenic activity.’ These can cause hairs to stay in the resting ‘telogen’ phase for longer,” says Dr Kaur. “Stopping the pill can sometimes cause the hair to enter the shedding phase too quickly because of the sudden drop in oestrogen - causing a common, temporary type of hair loss called ‘telogen effluvium (TE).’ (The hair does grow back though, usually after about six months.)” Overactive / underactive thyroid Our metabolism is regulated by the thyroid, which controls the production of proteins and tissue use of oxygen. So if the thyroid becomes overactive (hyperthyroidism) or underactive (hypothyroidism), the hair follicles can be affected leading to hair loss, which normally manifests evenly over the scalp, as opposed to being concentrated in one specific area. Iron deficiency/anaemia Iron is probably the most important nutrient for hair growth, as without it, the body can’t produce haemoglobin – which carries oxygen via the blood to repair and maintain the cells in your body, including those that produce the protein responsible for hair growth. Crash dieting Although there’s a current craze for fasting and extreme detoxing, this can have disastrous consequences when not carried out under strict medical supervision. Reduced food intake results in a lack of nutrients needed to sustain the hair follicle (such as iron – see above) so it can function properly. The natural life cycle of hair is that it grows and then falls out, during which time there is a resting ‘telogen’ period. If the body doesn’t get these vital nutrients during this period, it can actually stop new hairs from forming – resulting in hair loss and bald patches. Illness One of the commonest causes of hair loss is called "telogen effluvium". This can be triggered by any severe illness, for instance pneumonia or a major operation. The stress of the illness causes all hair follicles to go into their resting phase and hair growth temporarily ceases. COVID-19 Many scientists are considering hair loss to be a COVID symptom. Last August, Dr Natalie Lambert from Indiana University School of Medicine and Survivor Corps published a report which stated that 65.7% of 1,700 respondents were experiencing hair loss.  Another cohort study of patients has now found that one in five people hospitalised with Covid-19 experienced hair loss within six months of first being infected with the virus. Of the 1,655 people who took part in the study out of Jin Yin-tan Hospital in Wuhan last year that has been published in The Lancet Journal, 359 - or 22 per cent - reported losing hair. Discover more and watch our film #ItsNotJustHair at monpure.com/itsnotjusthair  

Learn more

What Not To Say To Someone With Hair Loss

  While female hair loss is a topic that rarely gets talked about, the lack of understanding can lead to some awkward and potentially insensitive conversations for those going through it. But there are ways to broach the topic without causing offence. One of our campaign stars Beth Finlay tells us more ... Women’s hair loss is not exactly an easy subject to talk about and as someone who’s suffered from Alopecia Areata for 10 years, I know this all too well. Whether you know someone going through it or you’ve experienced it yourself, expressing it to people can be difficult. When my hair started falling out at the age of 17, I was unbelievably embarrassed about it. I thought people would make fun of me, think I was weird and I also thought they would be disgusted by the fact some of my hair had fallen out. I spent years worrying if someone could see my bald patches or if they knew I was wearing a wig. Losing your hair as a woman can be soul destroying and it took me years to accept myself without hair because, let’s be honest, it just isn’t normalised in society. It’s a topic that isn’t talked about enough to enable women going through it to feel comfortable in their own skin. The thing is, studies show that fewer than 45% of women go through life with a full head of hair, so if it’s so common, why is it such a taboo subject?  We’re programmed to certain beauty standards and for women this often means having perfectly unattainable hair. From our Instagram feeds to movies and TV shows we’re constantly faced with the pressure to look a certain way. So when you lose your hair and you no longer represent what’s “feminine”, it can be hard to feel comfortable in your own skin. This can make many women (including myself) feel unattractive and unworthy. Where it’s normal and accepted for a man to have a shaved head, women with no hair are often mistaken for having a terminal illness or going through a nervous breakdown.  This social stigma surrounding women’s hair loss is part of the problem. I’ve been met with many comments about my hair (or lack of it) and often they come across as rude or uneducated on the topic. I’ve developed a thicker skin but it doesn’t mean the comments don’t hurt or upset me. Society as a whole has a lack of understanding on the topic because it’s rarely talked about, so in order to teach people about it we must open the conversation.  If you’re unsure how to talk to someone about their hair loss, I’ve outlined some ways of asking or discussing it without causing offence. Be empathetic and understanding but rather than offering up advice, take an opportunity to get educated. Ways to ask women about their hair loss: I love your shaved head! What made you decide to do it? You really suit a shaved head, do you mind if I ask you about why you chose to do it? I know someone who has experienced hair loss and I just want to say you’re amazing Do you mind if I ask about your hair loss and how it happened? Could you tell me about your hair loss? What NOT to say: Do you have cancer? Are you suffering from a terminal illness? What’s wrong with you? Are you having some sort of breakdown? Maybe you should try not to get so stressed? Are you wearing a wig…? I can’t think of anything worse than losing my hair Maybe it’s your diet... Click here to learn more about our campaign and watch our groundbreaking film It’s Not Just Hair.  

Learn more

What Is Trichotillomania?

Pronounced: trik-oh-till-oh-MAY-nee- uh or often shortened to TTM or ‘trich’, trichotillomania is a type of hair loss which is an anxiety condition. Watch Hattie’s story:  View this post on Instagram A post shared by MONPURE London (@monpurelondon)   What Is Trichotillomania? Trichotillomania occurs when patients have a strong urge to persistently rub or pull out their hair. It can be accompanied by other disorders, including depression, anxiety or obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). As with other types of hair loss, such as alopecia areata, periods of intense stress may trigger it.  Unfortunately, it remains one of the least researched and most misunderstood disorders, and many people feel like they’re the only ones going through it. Hair loss advocate Hattie Gilford explains: “A lot of people don't even know what trichotillomania is, even though one in 50 people have the condition. I think this is largely because people often feel too ashamed to talk about it. I really hope people watch this campaign and realise that they're not alone.”     She continues, “People often say 'just stop pulling your hair out" which is absolutely impossible – it's far from that simple. I battled trichotillomania for 18 years and it's the hardest journey I've ever been on. I felt like I was the only person in the world with trichotillomania, because it's not often spoken about.” Some people may pull their hair for sensory stimulation often focusing on the most coarse hairs on their head – as writer Ava Welsing-Kitcher wrote about for a piece in Stylist, explaining how it started:  “When I felt anxious or even just bored while watching TV, I’d absent-mindedly find my hand reaching towards my crown. The tension would build as I rifled through hairs to find the perfect one to pluck; once I had done so, the anxiety dissolved, only to be replaced with shame and frustration… but that wouldn’t stop me from repeating it. And so went the vicious cycle.” She describes how this became a regular occurrence. “As a teenager, I saw my hair pulling as a freakish bad habit … I’d catch my mother staring at my sparse crown area with such intense worry that it hurt me more than anything. ‘By getting rid of the coarse hairs, you’re denying your African heritage,’ she’d caution me, but it was never about race for me. The selected hairs just stood out, in the same way a lone grey might.” Trichotillomania is something our Head of Content Viola Levy also suffered with as a teenager. “I have naturally wavy hair and I tend to pull out any strands that are particularly coarse. I’m doing this with grey hairs too as I get older and more of them crop up. I also have a tendency to try and find brittle hair strands and snap them in half when I’m stressed,” she explains. “I did this a lot as a teenager – I remember taking a GCSE exam and the white question paper being covered in bits of my black hair by the end of the two hours. I used to pull at the nape of my neck where it was less visible (I still have tufts where it hasn’t grown back properly). When my hairdresser lifted up the back of my head, he asked why the hair was patchy and broken.” Constant hair pulling from the scalp can result in patches of hair loss, as well as scarring and infected hair follicles. It can also lead to scarring alopecia, where the pulled-out hair doesn’t always grow back. Hair pulling and subsequent hair loss can be very distressing for the person suffering it, and can interfere with their day to day lives and self-esteem. Some people with trichotillomania wear wigs or wig toppers, or style their hair in ways to disguise the areas where the hair has been pulled out. Trichotillomania also disproportionately affects women (possibly due to the fact that many of us have long hair which is easier to pull out). A staggering 70-93% of preadolescents and young adults with trichotillomania are female,* while according to the American Journal of psychiatry, adult female sufferers tend to outnumber males by three to one. In the 2010 documentary on trichotillomania Girls On The Pull, hair extensions specialist and salon owner Lucinda Ellery called it, “the worst form of hair loss that I have ever witnessed.” On her clients with the disorder, she used an intra-lace system designed to cover the area with mesh, extensions and hair, which acts as a barrier, preventing pulling and giving the hair a chance to re-grow. “The intra-lace is not a cure-all,” she noted. “Covering it up might make you feel better, but you have to learn to deal with the impulses.” Types of treatment for trichotillomania include hypnotherapy and cognitive behavioural therapy which aim to ascertain and dismantle the behavioural patterns and common triggers that contribute to the hair pulling. Talking therapies, relaxation and deep breathing techniques to deal with any underlying anxiety conditions are also used.  If you find yourself pulling your hair out, remember that you’re not alone and – most importantly – that it’s not your fault. It’s important to speak to your GP at the earliest opportunity, who can recommend the appropriate course of treatment and therapies to deal with any accompanying mental health issues.      You can also join our new community support page @It’sNotJustHair_ is a place where women with hair loss can share their stories, understand more about the condition and connect with others going through a similar experience. Hattie features in our new campaign film It’s Not Just Hair and has dealt with trichotillomania for 18 years. Click here to read more about her story. If you would like to share your own hair loss story, upload a video or selfie and don’t forget to tag @monpurelondon #itsnotjusthair . Let’s break the silence surrounding female hair loss. Have a question for our team of experts? Email us at experts@monpure.com *Mayo Clinic  

Learn more

MONPURE in Vogue

MONPURE have been making waves recently, both at home and across the pond. It’s not every day you get on the radar of US Vogue, but we recently caught the attention of writer Chloe Malle, who had this to say about our range: “The London-based brand focuses on the scalp as the key to healthy hair with a variety of hair stimulating options.”     Our awareness-raising campaign It’s Not Just Hair has also been gaining traction in the media. We were delighted when legendary British supermodel Jade Parfitt lent her support to the campaign, appearing in The Sunday Telegraph’s Stella Magazine where she spoke about her own experience with postpartum hair loss.  Speaking to beauty editor Sonia Haria, she commented: “You realise how your hair health is tied to your mental health, how you feel about yourself and how you present yourself to the world.” You can watch Jade Parfitt’s recent Insta Live chat with one of our campaign stars Beth Finlay here. Two more stars of our campaign Christala Fletcher and Rima Theisen were recently profiled in The Metro, speaking about their experiences with hair loss. ‘It’s incredibly sad that female hair loss is not deemed acceptable in comparison to male hair loss,’ says Christala. ‘Women are often judged and ridiculed for not having long flowing locks and that for some reason through negative images in the media “bald” equals “ugly” or not feminine when in actual fact it takes a beautiful strong woman to be able to rock a bald head. ‘I find it brings out each woman’s unique beauty when you remove the hair.’ And if that wasn’t enough, our Hydrate and Soothe Scalp Serum is a firm favourite with the editors at The New York Times T Magazine who included it in a recent roundup. “For those whose scalps are itchy, irritated or sunburned, there’s MONPURE’s Hydrate and Soothe Scalp Serum.” Discover more about MONPURE’s pioneering new campaign here.  

Learn more

Friends of MONPURE: Jade Parfitt

  Legendary British supermodel, Jade Parfitt needs little introduction. Over the last 25 years, Jade has taken to the runway and starred in campaigns for the most prestigious fashion houses including Prada, Chanel, Christian Dior, Alexander McQueen, Givenchy, Versace and Jean Paul Gaultier. We were delighted that Jade chose to partner with us to help amplify our campaign It’s Not Just Hair, raising awareness and erasing the stigma of female hair loss. She recently graced the pages of The Sunday Telegraph’s Stella Magazine as a guest beauty editor, chatting to their editor Sonia Haria about how her supermodel career together with having children had an effect on her hair.  She also chatted to us about her own hair journey and how this was affected by her modelling career and motherhood: “My hair has always been fine and flyaway. I am not sure it ever really recovered fully from the ten years of intense stress it was put under when I was doing all the fashion shows in my late teens and twenties. I always tried to inflict as little damage on it myself when I wasn’t working, plus I took regular supplements during those years to try to help my hair and skin look as good as they could. “Postpartum hair loss is pretty much par for the course when you have a baby. It’s a stressful time, you’re probably surviving on minimal sleep, and then when you do manage a shower you see your hair coming out almost by the handful. I do wish I hadn’t worried about it so much the first time it happened to me. I also wish I’d had access to the brilliant MONPURE range, like the shampoo, which make such a difference to the health and thickness of my scalp and hair. “I love that all the ingredients in MONPURE products have been scientifically proven to work, these are gorgeous, luxury products that do the job. Plus the fact they are ethically and sustainably sourced, completely vegan and cruelty free. This is a very modern brand that makes you feel good not only in your skin but also in respect to the environment. “I am ashamed to say, I had no idea that female hair loss is such a common issue for so many women. I found the MONPURE campaign to be really enlightening. I thought that all the women involved told their stories in such an open and heartfelt way. It really drove home for me just how intrinsically our hair is tied to our views of ourselves, how our own perception of our own beauty can have such an effect on how we think of ourselves in the world. And how all this ties in with our own mental health as well as physical health.” Tune in tomorrow night! We are very lucky to be hosting Jade for an Insta Live chat tomorrow evening at 7pm GMT with one of the stars of our campaign, Beth Finlay, so make sure to tune in and pose your questions for one of the top ‘supers’ on the planet. @monpurelondon Jade also recently recorded a video to explain a bit more about her involvement in the campaign. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Jade Parfitt (@jadeparfitt) Click here to learn more about our campaign and watch our groundbreaking film It’s Not Just Hair.

Learn more

Presenting: It’s Not Just Hair

“The beauty world is built upon women with long, flowing locks. If you don't have that, you feel like you don't fit in.” – Christala Fletcher, Wig Maker and Female Hair Loss Advocate.   This week is very special for the team at MONPURE. It’s our one-year anniversary and to celebrate, we wanted to do something meaningful for our first campaign. We are very excited to be launching a pioneering new campaign and feature film to raise awareness of female hair loss. #ItsNotJustHair explores the impact of female hair loss through the eyes of five women going through it. Narrated entirely by them, we hear deeply personal accounts of their hair loss journeys, as well as their views on how society treats women with this condition.  Told entirely in their own words, the women talk about how far they’ve come on their individual hair loss journeys and what they’ve learnt as a result. They highlight the lack of visibility and support currently available; how their daily lives have changed; and how they have learned to adapt and embrace their new hair identity.  In the coming months we will be diving deeper into the topic of female hair loss, hosting a number of Instagram live events and workshops, where you can meet our experts, celebrity guests and #ItsNotJustHair contributors and ask them your female hair loss-related questions.  We would like to thank all of our contributors for being part of this journey with us – this campaign is dedicated to them and anyone else going through female hair loss. We hope you will feel moved and inspired by their stories as much as we were. Click below to watch the film: And visit our dedicated campaign page It’s Not Just Hair for more information and support and how you can help carry our message further. Discover It’s Not Just Hair.

Learn more

Watch the trailer of our new film #ItsNotJustHair

Many affected by hair loss are often told “it’s just hair”. But for a lot of women, hair is our identity. We’d like to offer you a sneak peek of our upcoming film #ItsNotJust hair - click below to watch And don’t forget to follow our social media channels for more exciting content. Instagram: @monpurelondon Facebook: /monpurelondon Youtube: MONPURE London Twitter @monpurelondon TikTok @monpurelondon Let’s break the silence together – join in the conversation on May 4th

Learn more

Meet Our Experts: Dr Simmy Kaur

  Dr Simmy is MONPURE’s Resident GP – providing her expertise for our customer queries, as well penning many of our science-led articles for The Journal.  With more than 13 years of medical experience, Dr Simmy has worked in some of the busiest hospitals and GP clinics in London and regularly treats scalp conditions and hair loss. She also has a deep understanding of the emotional toll that hair loss can take, factoring in a patient’s psychological wellbeing as well as the physical side of this condition. We caught up with her to find out more and know best scalp and haircare advice… What made you become a GP?  Well firstly, I love working with people! Secondly, general practice allows me to work across a wide variety of specialities - so it never gets boring!   What is it about the skin (and the scalp!) that fascinates you the most?  I've always been interested in health and beauty from a young age, so I guess it was a natural progression! Its ability to heal and rejuvenate is something that I find particularly interesting - it's amazing how good skin and hair can transform how a person looks and feels.  How can our GP help with the scalp and hair growth?  GPs are the first point of call for anybody with skin or hair problems. They will be able to take a history of the problem, they'll be able to examine you if necessary and then suggest a treatment plan. There are a certain number of investigations and treatments that we can try in clinic, before referring to a dermatologist if required.  What was it about MONPURE that made you want to become part of their team of experts?  I love that MONPURE products are clean, sustainable, vegan and cruelty-free. The formulas are backed by good science as well as being totally luxurious which I absolutely love!  What's been the highlight of your career so far?  It's hard to choose one particular highlight as there have been so many along the way, on my journey as a doctor but I think in general, working alongside my fellow colleagues in the NHS has been a real privilege and honour. Becoming part of the MONPURE team of experts has most certainly been a recent highlight!  If you had to offer just once piece of scalp care advice, what would it be?  Use good products, with great ingredients.  What's the biggest misconception people have about their scalp in your opinion?  I guess a lot of people treat the skin on the face and body differently to that of the scalp - the scalp deserves as much attention as the rest of the skin on the body in my opinion, which is a key ethos of MONPURE.  What are the most common scalp complaints that your patients come to you with?  The top 3 would have to be dry/flaky scalp, hair loss and hair thinning.  What are the main causes of itchy/irritated scalp skin?  There are lots, but the most common would be seborrheic dermatitis aka dandruff. Other common causes include contact dermatitis, scalp psoriasis and tinea capitis. As well as topical solutions, what else can people do to maintain a healthy scalp and hair? Taking a supplement can be helpful such as a good multivitamin and vitamin D. Biotin, iron, folic acid, b12, vitamin C, zinc, and collagen have also been associated with good hair growth but it’s equally important to have a healthy lifestyle and balanced diet. It's also good to keep hair care practices such as colouring, perming and relaxing to a minimum.   What's your favourite MONPURE product and why?  I absolutely love the Clarifying Scalp Scrub! It makes my scalp feel really clean and exfoliates really well, which preps my scalp for the next step of my regime which is the MONPURE Hydrate and Soothe Scalp Serum - the exfoliation allows it to absorb better.  How has the nature of your job changed over the past 12 months?  I guess a lot has changed in healthcare but in particular, in general practice, a big change has been the way in which we conduct consultations - the vast majority are now done remotely via telephone, video consultation, picture sharing and web chats. This makes accessing healthcare in most cases more convenient and utilises modern technology. However nothing beats the good old fashioned human factor and seeing someone in person! Have a question for our team of experts? Email us at experts@monpure.com  

Learn more

“How pregnancy has transformed my hair…”

Aside from a baby bump, many pregnant women notice an overall change in their bodies – not least their scalp and hair. To give us more of an insight, we spoke to our lovely Head of Customer Services, India (who some of you might have already spoken to) about how her own hair – and haircare regime – has changed since becoming pregnant. She tells us how she copes with it and which products she now cannot live without! What were your main scalp and hair concerns before getting pregnant? The texture of my hair would constantly change! One day it could be super voluminous, the next it could be flat as a pancake! What did your routine mainly consist of? I always took care to use a quality shampoo with a gentle, non-drying formula. I actually came across MONPURE’s Strengthening Silk Protein Shampoo and Essence-Conditioner before joining the brand! The difference they made to my hair was a wonderful surprise. How have your scalp and hair changed since pregnancy? Dramatically! It’s grown at a rapid speed, yet it the thinnest it has ever been. So my main focus has been on detangling knots while trying to boost volume … it’s not been easy! What's the most interesting advice you've received with regards to pregnancy haircare? I can tell you the most useless kind: that I should enjoy my luscious hair because it’ll be gone once I give birth! As this “luscious hair” did not happen for me, it’s advice that went in one ear and out the other! What kinds of ingredients (if any) were you told to avoid? I trusted products that were guaranteed pregnancy safe.  MONPURE really lets you indulge without any anxiety thanks to all the meticulous safety testing they do (their German manufacturers are meticulous!). Which hair products have been a godsend since getting pregnant? The Follicle Boost Hair Density Serum! It’s helped both with the thinning and volume issues!  As Head of Customer Service do you get a lot of questions about pregnancy haircare? If so, what are the most common concerns? Absolutely! Hair is a very concerning topic once you start seeing a difference or a shift in its condition or length. Especially during pregnancy, a time of physical and mental upheaval. Most of our queries are about postpartum hair issues - which is something we love helping people with! What's the one MONPURE product you would recommend for mums-to-be? If I had to pick just the one... it would be Follicle Boost! The effects are just insane! But I do think the trio of the Strengthening Silk Protein Shampoo and Essence-Conditioner and Follicle Boost are a winning trio, with the indulgence of the Heal and Energise Jade Comb that can just help you relax as you massage your scalp with it! Watch India’s Scalpcare Sunday routine here: Itchy scalp? Your period could be the cause … Click here to find out why.

Learn more

Five eco-friendly ways to dispose of your packing chips

  Happy World Earth Day!  Here at MONPURE we’re all about caring for our beautiful planet and its people as much as we do your scalp and hair, it’s important to us that we stay true to our sustainable ethos at every step of this journey. And hopefully where we lead, more beauty brands will follow. If you place an order with us, in your beautiful green MONPURE box (which you can repurpose fyi) your products will be protected by our special packing chips. Rather than polystyrene-based, ours are made from biodegradable corn starch. This means you can dispose of them sustainably and they won’t end up in a landfill!  Here are five things you can do with yours… Throw them in the rubbish bin. Even if you don’t do anything special with them afterward, these chips will still biodegrade within 72 days. (Although they might take up space, meaning you’ll have to replace your bin bag earlier. Dissolve and pour down the sink. These chips are non-toxic and won’t pollute the waterways or harm aquatic life. (If you want to conserve water, use the water in your washing up bowl once you’ve finished doing the dishes.) Pop them on the compost heap. These corn starch chips are ‘food grade’ so if you add it to your compost, it will naturally decompose along with other organic matter, going back into the soil so nature’s cycle is complete. Use them to keep your plants hydrated. Did you know corn starch is great for retaining moisture in soil, so your plants don’t dry out so quickly? Add a little water and mix until the chips dissolve into a paste and add to the soil. Reuse them! These corn starch chips can be reused (providing they don’t get wet!) for keeping fragile items safe in transit, so it might be worth hanging on to them if you’re sending a parcel or moving home. To show our commitment to people and planet. MONPURE are B-Corp pending – find out more about what this means here.  

Learn more